NEU help and advice pages comprise FAQs and other guidance which address common employment workplace issues and are entirely problem focused. These documents, along with our current top 5 FAQs posed by members, represent the quickest way to get support if you need it.

Other ways to get help

Your first point of contact is your workplace reps - they are best placed to discuss your next steps to dealing with your issue. If you don't know who that is, contact your branch for assistance. Find the contact details here.

You also contact the Employment AdviceLine - however, please be advised that this national service deals with a very high volume of emails and calls and your waiting time for a response may be long.

If you can't find the answer to your question below, speaking to your rep or branch secretary will be the quickest way to answer your query.


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  • Practical tips to help when asked to attend an urgent meeting with the head or principal at short notice without being given an agenda or an indication of its purpose


  • The Independent Teacher Workload Review Groups were established by the DfE to report on, and suggest solutions to, unnecessary burdens associated with marking, planning and data management.


  • Coronavirus FAQs for all members who are pregnant or on maternity leave
  • As well as statutory maternity rights, most teachers are also covered by the maternity rights scheme for teachers, set out in the Burgundy Book national agreement on conditions of service.

  • The legal definitions of pregnancy and maternity discrimination, who is protected and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.


  • Advice for teachers and support staff on the administration of medicines

  • A guide to what anaphylaxis is, and how to support pupils at risk

  • Guidance on what asthma is, what can trigger it, and how to support pupils at risk

  • Guidance on issues regarding pupil incontinence, and how schools can adopt policies to help.
  • Information and guidance for school staff to support the uninterrupted education of children with diabetes.

  • Advice on how to deal with epilepsy and seizures in schools, including how to recognise when a pupil might be having a seizure.

  • How to tackle the problem of head lice in schools, including facts about head lice and head lice treatment

  • This guidance is intended to clarify the circumstances in which existing and prospective employers are entitled to make enquiries about a worker’s health and dispel some of the myths which may give rise to discriminatory practice.
  • Issues which often arise in relation to medical assessments at work.
  • Some of the most common issues arising in relation to medical reports prepared by GPs, occupational health physicians and other health professionals on behalf of employers, pension scheme trustees and health insurers.
  • Advice for school staff to support the uninterrupted education of children with sickle cell disorder and thalassaemia.


  • NEU leadership members are key to supporting women going through the menopause in the workplace. As a leader, you’re not alone. Collaboration between leaders, governors, workplace reps, health and safety reps and a staff support network can go a long way towards creating a supportive environment for women experiencing menopause symptoms at work.
  • The menopause is an occupational health issue for women educators, as well as being an equality issue. It is important that schools and colleges are suitable workplaces for menopausal women. The purpose of this guide and checklist for reps is to signpost you to advice, and to support you in improving workplace conditions for menopausal women.
  • The purpose of this guidance is to suggest practical ways in which the school and college environment can be improved for women who are going through the menopause.


  • Ten points on the role of secondary schools in supporting student mental health and wellbeing during this period of change and school closures.
  • Ten points on the role of primary schools in supporting child mental health and wellbeing during this period of change and school closures.
  • Inspection briefing and checklist for NEU health and safety reps to use during the coronavirus crisis.
  • This guidance document is aimed at NEU members who are worried that their mental health is suffering because of the demands of their work. It will also be of use to NEU members who are considering returning to work following a spell of absence due to a mental health condition.
  • This guidance explains why taking stress seriously and tackling it will make your college a more effective organisation, and how to go about it, with step-by step advice and case studies from colleges that have found approaches that work

  • Excessive workload is a key cause of mental health problems among teachers and education professionals. This advice explains what to do if you are struggling with mental health and outlines the different ways you can get support.

  • This charter, when followed, will help to ensure that the way work is organised does not cause or contribute to ill-health.

  • The NEU offers an online staff stress survey as a resource for local officers, reps and safety reps to assist them gather evidence about stress levels within a school and establish the causes and impact of this workplace stress.
  • In response to requests for assistance with undertaking stress surveys, a system has been developed which enables the NEU to provide an online staff stress survey as a resource for local officers, reps and safety reps.
  • As a school leader, it is important to ensure that your school is a great place to work, with a happy and healthy workforce and low levels of sick leave.

  • It is important to understand the extent of governing body’s responsibilities for managing health, safety and welfare of teachers and ways in which the NEU and governors can work together to safeguard the mental health of teachers.

  • This advice explains the ‘resilience’ approach, why it does not lead to meaningful improvements for employees and how safety reps should instead seek to tackle work related stress in their school or college.
  • A stress risk assessment is a careful examination of what in a workplace could cause staff to suffer from work-related stress, so that you can weigh up whether you have done enough, or should do more to prevent harm.
  • Excessive workload and working hours are continually cited by teachers as one of the main causes of their workplace stress. This advice explains how to tackle stress at a local level in your workplace.

  • If someone is threatening imminent suicide call 999 and stay with them until the emergency services arrive.


  • Advice for trainee members on the role of a mentor, how to work best with your mentor and what to do if you feel you are not being supported.