NEU help and advice pages comprise FAQs and other guidance which address common employment workplace issues and are entirely problem focused. These documents, along with our current top 5 FAQs posed by members, represent the quickest way to get support if you need it.

Other ways to get help

Your first point of contact is your workplace reps - they are best placed to discuss your next steps to dealing with your issue. If you don't know who that is, contact your branch for assistance. Find the contact details here.

You also contact the Employment AdviceLine - however, please be advised that this national service deals with a very high volume of emails and calls and your waiting time for a response may be long.

If you can't find the answer to your question below, speaking to your rep or branch secretary will be the quickest way to answer your query.


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  • The use of verbal abuse as a form of bullying of disabled children and young people is widespread. This has a significant negative impact on self-esteem and achievement.
  • The legal definition of disability discrimination, who is protected and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • The legal definition of harassment on grounds of disability, who is protected and the first steps you should take if you think you are being subjected to such harassment.
  • The duty to make reasonable adjustments requires school and college leaders to proactively identify barriers (both physical and attitudinal) to the inclusion of disabled people in the workplace.

  • This charter, when followed, will help to ensure that the way work is organised does not cause or contribute to ill-health.

  • The Equality Act 2010 requires employers to make reasonable adjustments to premises or working practices to ensure that employees are not disadvantaged because of their disability.


  • Practical tips to help when asked to attend an urgent meeting with the head or principal at short notice without being given an agenda or an indication of its purpose


  • The use of verbal abuse as a form of bullying of disabled children and young people is widespread. This has a significant negative impact on self-esteem and achievement.
  • Who is protected from age discrimination and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • Who is protected from harassment on grounds of age and the first steps you should take if you think you are being subjected to such harassment.
  • The legal definition of disability discrimination, who is protected and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • The legal definition of harassment on grounds of disability, who is protected and the first steps you should take if you think you are being subjected to such harassment.
  • This toolkit is aimed at school representatives and teacher governors in all schools and FE colleges, including independent schools in England and Wales. It will also be a useful resource for Division Secretaries and Equalities Officers.
  • How to deal with cases of harassment and bullying of NEU members.

  • This guidance is intended to clarify the circumstances in which existing and prospective employers are entitled to make enquiries about a worker’s health and dispel some of the myths which may give rise to discriminatory practice.
  • A policy statement on Islamophobia

  • The results of UK Feminista and NEU’s groundbreaking study are clear: schools, education bodies and Government must take urgent action to tackle sexism in schools. "It's just everywhere" is a study on sexism in schools and how we tackle it.

  • Following this case, the Government will be required to take action to compensate members of public sector pension schemes who were excluded from protection measures applied when schemes changed in 2014 and 2015. 
  • The duty to make reasonable adjustments requires school and college leaders to proactively identify barriers (both physical and attitudinal) to the inclusion of disabled people in the workplace.

  • Issues which often arise in relation to medical assessments at work.
  • The legal definitions of pregnancy and maternity discrimination, who is protected and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • The legal definitions of race discrimination, who is protected, and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • The legal definition of racial harassment, who is protected and the first steps you should take if you think you are being subjected to racial harassment.
  • Who is protected from discrimination on grounds of religion or belief and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • Who is protected from religion or belief harassment and the first steps you should take if you think you are being subjected to such harassment.
  • The legal definitions of sex discrimination, who is protected and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • Who is protected from sexual harassment and the first steps you should take if you think you are being subjected to such harassment.
  • Who is protected from sexual orientation discrimination, and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • Who is protected from harassment on grounds of sexual orientation, and the first steps you should take if you think you have been harassed at work.
  • Trade union victimisation, who is protected from it and the first steps you should take if you think you have been victimised at work.
  • Who is protected from transgender discrimination, and the first steps you should take if you think you have been discriminated against at work.
  • Who is protected from harassment on grounds of transgender status,and the first steps you should take if you think you have been harassed at work.
  • This briefing considers a number of important health and safety issues affecting women school staff and advises how to address them.